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Tagged ‘Health disparities’

Congressional Families Cancer Prevention Program hosts webcast on social determinants of health

Where you live affects your health. Life expectancies and chronic disease rates vary from zip code to zip code, even across small geographic distances. Experts say the reasons for this are the social determinants of health, which are “conditions in the places where people live, learn, work and play that affect a wide range of […]

What your zip code says about your health [webcast]

Webcast: What Your Zip Code Says About Your Health Thursday, April 19, 2018, 11 AM EDT Moderated by Maggie Fox, Senior Health Reporter, NBC News Panelists: Sherrie Flynt Wallington, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Oncology at the Georgetown University Medical Center, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center  Electra Paskett, Ph.D., Associate Director for Population Sciences, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio […]

National Minority Health Month

National Minority Health Month is a time to call attention to cancer health disparities that adversely impact minority groups, which include—but are not limited to—people of color and people living in poverty. According to the American Cancer Society, Hispanic women are more likely to get cervical cancer and African-American women are more likely to die […]

The Super Colon from coast to coast

The Prevent Cancer Super Colon® was on the road this summer to share information about colorectal cancer prevention and early detection with underserved communities. As part of the effort to reach a national goal of getting 80 percent of the recommended population screened for colorectal cancer by 2018, the Super Colon headed to Phoenix for […]

Things to know about hepatitis C on National African-American Hepatitis C Action Day

Today is National African-American Hepatitis C Action Day (NAAHCAD). Hepatitis C is a serious virus that can lead to liver cancer if left untreated. Unfortunately, African-American communities are especially vulnerable to hepatitis C infections and its associated diseases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 3.5 million people are currently living with hepatitis […]

Prevent Cancer Foundation® reaches underserved rural communities

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Lisa Berry Lisa.Berry@preventcancer.org 703-519-2107 The Prevent Cancer Foundation® partners with Health Wagon of Wise, Virginia, to bring information about cancer prevention and early detection to underserved people of Appalachia. Alexandria, VA – Each year, the Rural Area Medical (RAM) event in Wise, Virginia, sees thousands of underserved people who live in […]

ICYMI: July 7, 2017

Feature Story Deaths from cancer higher in rural America, CDC finds THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (The Washington Post) — Despite decreases in cancer death rates nationwide, a new report shows they are higher in rural America than in urban areas of the United States. The report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and […]

No woman should die of cervical cancer

In the United States, cervical cancer is becoming less common thanks to increased vaccinations, improved screening rates and better treatments. But incidence and death rates remain high among women in underserved areas across the country. We talked to MD Anderson’s Kathleen M. Schmeler, M.D. about the Project ECHO program that trains community health providers to […]

ICYMI: January 6, 2017

Feature Story Cancer death rate has dropped again. But it’s still higher for men than women. THURSDAY, January 5, 2017 (The Washington Post) –The cancer death rate in the United States has dropped by 25 percent since its 1991 peak, resulting in 2 million fewer cancer deaths than if the rate had stayed the same, […]

Help Raise Awareness about the Link between Viruses and Cancer in Minority Populations

Though cancer affects people of all races and ethnicities, there is a greater disease burden for certain populations. This is also true for viruses that are linked to cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C are preventable viruses that can lead to several types of cancer and disproportionally affect communities of color. For […]